Ganymede Casts a Massive Shadow Across Jupiter in Spectacular New Image From NASA’s Juno Spacecraft

Juno Captures Moon Shadow on Jupiter

Figure 1. Citizen scientist Thomas Thomopoulos created this enhanced-color image using raw data from the JunoCam instrument. At the time the raw image was taken, the Juno spacecraft was about 44,000 miles (71,000 kilometers) above Jupiter’s cloud tops, at a latitude of about 55 degrees south, and 15 times closer than Ganymede, which orbits about 666,000 miles (1.1 million kilometers ) away from Jupiter. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS, Image processing by Thomas Thomopoulos © CC BY

Ganymede’s Shadow Projected Onto Globe of Jupiter

Figure 2. Illustration of the approximate geometry of the Ganymede’s shadow projected onto a globe of Jupiter.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS, Image processing by Brian Swift © CC BY

JunoCam captured this image from very close to Jupiter, making Ganymede’s shadow appear especially large. Figure 2, created by citizen scientist Brian Swift using JunoCam data, illustrates the approximate geometry of the visible area, projected onto a globe of Jupiter.

JunoCam’s raw images are available for the public to peruse and process into image products at https://missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam/processing.

Jupiter is the largest planet in the Solar System and the fifth planet from the Sun. It is a gas giant with a mass that is more than two and a half times that of all the other planets in the Solar System combined, but is only about one-thousandth the mass of the Sun. Jupiter, behind the Moon and

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