SpaceX launches rocket from Cape Canaveral after Hurricane Nicole

SpaceX successfully launches rocket from Cape Canaveral after Hurricane Nicole



today’s booster is flying for its 14th time previously having supported Dragon’s first crewed demonstration mission. The radar start constellation mission Sirius XM seven and 10 previous starlink missions, if you look closely at this rocket, you see that we don’t have any landing legs here or grit fins. In fact on this first stage and that’s because we won’t be attempting to land this first stage today. Today’s mission requires additional propellant that we would normally use for recovery and so we’re going to be using that propellant to take the payloads to orbit. Now moving up above the first stage, we’ve got our second stage that has *** single merlin vacuum or m back engine that ignites shortly after the first stage will separate and it’s the second stage that will carry the intelsat Galaxy 31 32 satellites to orbit the payload for today’s launch are enclosed inside the 17 ft diameter payload fairing which is that nose cone structure at the very top of the second stage. It’s made of *** carbon composite material and it protects the satellites as we make our way to orbit. Will jettison those fairing halves approximately three minutes into the flight. And both of those fairing halves are flight proven having both of them flying for their fifth times. Will be attempting to recover them after separation on *** recovery vessel named bob. Lastly that large trust structure next to the vehicle is called the transporter erector or the T. E. We use it to roll the rock it out to the pad and raise it to its vertical launch position. Now the T. E. E. Routes vehicle fluids power and telemetry from the ground systems to the rocket and that continues until Falcon nine switches over to internal power and clears the pad. Now. You might be able to see it there. We’ve begun to open the clamp arms around the second stage That’s in preparation for transporter erector retract And that’s where the T. E. will begin to slightly back away from the stage to clear the way for liftoff at T zero hydraulic systems. There’s *** call out therapy strong back retract the at t minus zero. The hydraulic systems will actually pull the T. E. Further away, clearing the way further for Falcon Nine’s liftoff. And you can see there the tv making *** small angle with the first stage. You also may have heard some call outs there that we’ve begun pressurizing the stage in preparation for to retract. So we began pressurizing the system. We use *** helium pressuring on the on Falcon 9 to pressurize the tanks. At this point in the countdown, we are nearly fully loaded with about *** million pounds of RP one fuel that the type of refined kerosene and liquid oxygen on the vehicle. We just heard the call out there that liquid oxygen loading is complete on the first stage. We’ll hear *** similar call out for liquid oxygen loading complete on the second stage. The falcon nine uses rocket propellant one as its fuel and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer. An oxidizer is *** type of chemical that *** fuel requires to burn and we chill that liquid oxygen significantly below its boiling point that allows us to load more mass per volume into the vehicle and get more propellant and performance out of the rocket. In addition to both the RP one and liquid oxygen, we use *** chemical called tab try ethel, aluminum and try ethel boring as an ignition source. When we combine those two chemicals, they perform *** excuse me, they produce *** hot flame and ignite the RP one and liquid oxygen to make the rocket go Coming up. We’re about 10 seconds away from liquid oxygen loading complete on the second stage. With that call out, we will be completely loaded with propellants for flight Stage two locks so complete So with that we are fully loaded with propellants in preparation for liftoff, we’ll see some venting from the transporter erector coming up here. Just *** quick status update. Both the payloads continuing to look healthy whether 90% go. It’s *** beautiful day of Florida today for that on time lift off there. You can see on this wide angle shot, you can see some venting from the transporter erector. We’re clearing out the liquid oxygen from the lines and preparation for liftoff. That’s totally normal coming up about 20 seconds from now. We’ll have our next major milestone. That’s where falcon nine’s internal flight computers will take control of the countdown. That’s where Falcon Nine transitions to start up startup. So from here the launch team will provide their final go for liftoff LD go for launch. So without the launch director giving their final go for launch last 30 seconds 30 seconds to go. Let’s watch as Falcon Nine takes Intelsat Galaxy 31 32 to orbit 15 seconds -10,987 654321 and lift off of Intelsat Galaxy 31 32 go Falcon nine vehicles fishing downrange and on the chamber pressure phenomenal, Successful liftoff of Falcon nine from space launch complex. 40 space force station in florida were carrying the Intelsat Galaxy 31 32 payloads to orbit. Now we’ve just begun throttling down the Merlin one D engines in preparation for maximum dynamic pressure And we’ve also begun to tilt the engines that’s called gambling and that’s why we’ve begun to move horizontally away from the launch pad. That maneuver is called *** gravity turn execute so call out there for max Q. That’s the point of maximum aerodynamic pressure briefly going back to the gravity turn. We are still heading up as you can see the speed and altitude are increasing but we’re also heading away from the launch pad And we do that because *** rocket needs to go about 17,500 mph horizontally in order to avoid being pulled back to planet Earth. So we’ll keep speeding up the vehicle to get to orbit coming up in about *** minute. We’ve got three events back to back that is main engine cut off, followed by stage separation. And then second engine start. Number one. Main engine cut off is where we’ll shut down all nine of the merlin one D engines on the first stage. That’s in preparation for stage separation where the first stage will push off the second stage and then second engine start number one where we’ll ignite, ignite the merlin vacuum engine on the second stage. So again, Miko main engine cut off, followed by stage separation and then s. e. s. one gotta love those beautiful views. This is *** view from the first stage camera, looking down the body of the first stage towards planet Earth, you can see the Merlin Wendy’s plume expanding as the density gets less and less. Big girl stage separation confirmed And recognition. Stage one FTS is saved. Awesome. So Miko stage step and second engine start complete. Coming up next in about 20 or so seconds will be fairing separation again, both of these fairing halves having flown five times before today’s mission and some great views of planet Earth behind the merlin vacuum engine bearing separation confirmed. So there is successful fairing separation will be attempting to recover those fairing halves again. Once they make their way back to Earth on *** recovery vessel named bob. You can actually see one of the fairing halves in frame there as it goes back to planet Earth. We actually got our first glimpse of the payload as well today. As *** reminder, we are not attempting landing on our first stage. So the next major milestone will be second engine cut off number one, that’s about four minutes from now And again. The reason we’re not attempting to recover our first stage today is because today’s payload needed *** little more performance out of Falcon nine and so we had to use the propellants that we would normally use for the entry burn and landing burn to instead take the payload to orbit. Now the first of these two burns is taking us into what’s called *** parking orbit. So that is *** roughly circular orbit that will be going into before we take *** second burn later on in today’s broadcast and ultimately the payloads will be going to what’s called *** geostationary transfer orbit before they continue their mission on to geo stationary orbit. So for this first burn, the Merlin vacuum engine is continuing to burn and take the second stage and the payloads to orbit. Now the Merlin vacuum engine is extremely similar to the Merlin one D engines. It does feature more redundancy and *** much larger expansion nozzle and that allows us to maximize the efficiency of the burn in space. And the reason that that expansion nozzle makes the burn more efficient is because we’re able to expand the gasses further in the vacuum of space than we are on the ground On the ground. We’ve got about £14 per square inch of pressure from the atmosphere pushing down on us. And so as you try to expand the gas, you have to keep the pressure matching with that atmospheric pressure. That means you can’t get as much push out of the gas out of the nozzle, but in the vacuum of space, we don’t have to contend with that. And so we can actually get more of the force out of the expanding propellant to push the second stage. And that increases the efficiency and Merlin vacuum operates with the highest efficiency ever made for an american hydrocarbon rocket engine. You may have noticed on the pad that the second stage looks very similar to the first stage. It doesn’t just look similar, it has the same diameter, it uses the same metal composition in the tanks, the same computers and the same propellants and almost the same engine that allows us to use similar tooling design techniques and systems to build two rockets that are more reliable. Anything that we learn on the first stage often applies to the second stage and vice versa. Now, if you’re just joining us. Welcome. You’re watching our webcast coverage of the intelsat Galaxy 31 32 mission. You’ve got *** view of the second stage Merlin vacuum engine along with planet Earth behind us. We’re about four minutes in to *** five minute burn. We had successful liftoff stage separation and second engine start as well as fairing separation from space launch complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force station and we didn’t attempt to recover our first stage today as we needed the propellants for additional performance to get our payloads to orbit. Now we’re currently awaiting second engine cut off number one or Seiko one That coming up in just about 20 seconds from now terminal guidance Stage two FTS is safe overall and back shut down. There is successful confirmation of Seco one. So now the teams are gonna be evaluating the orbit that we’re in. Make sure that we’re right on track And with that call out we are in *** nominal orbit again, this is the first orbit it is *** parking orbit in preparation for our next event and since we didn’t attempt to land our first stage today, the next major milestone will be ignition of our merlin vacuum engine again, that’s for second engine start number two expected at about 26 minutes. Excuse me about 26 minutes into the mission. So until then Please enjoy the space tunes and the views from space. We’ll see you back at about T-plus 26. Yeah, expected loss of signal will move acquisition of signal given Welcome back to our webcast coverage of the falcon nine mission carrying the Galaxy 31 32 satellites for our customer intelsat. Now we’ve had *** normal mission so far Falcon nine launched on time at 11:06 a.m. Eastern time from space launch complex 40 now this and after that the second stage completed its first burn, taking our payload into its initial parking orbit. At this point, we are just under *** minute away from second ignition of the merlin vacuum engine, which will carry the second stage and the Galaxy 31 32 payloads into the targeted geo stationary transfer orbit. That’ll be the payload deploy orbit recognition. There is successful startup of the Maryland vacuum engine. Now this brand will last just *** little bit over *** minute and I mentioned that we’re going to *** geo stationary transfer orbit. So to uh, the first orbit that we put the payloads into today is called the parking orbit. That was *** slightly elliptical orbit. But now we’re taking the apogee, that’s the highest point of the orbit all the way up to about 38,000 km above the Earth’s surface. Now, since that’s like *** huge number. Um, as ***, as *** point of context, the entire circumference of the Earth is about 40,000 km. So we’re taking the stage about as high up as it is to go around the Earth. Now, the payloads are still attached to the stage at this point. So they’re coming along for the ride And once we are in this highly elliptical orbit around our planet, we will transition into payload separation. Is there *** successful shutdown of the merlin vacuum engine? We’re going to take *** look at the orbital parameters with the ground team nominal orbit insertion and so with that nominal orbit. As I mentioned, the Galaxy 31 32 satellites are still attached to falcon nine. Second stage payload deployment will begin in about five minutes first. We’ll be starting with the Galaxy 32 satellite followed by Galaxy 31 about five minutes after that. So while we wait, we’re gonna jump back into *** coast phase so hopefully enjoy the views when we get them back and enjoy the space tunes acquisition of signal, how to be spoken. Welcome back if you’re just joining us. Welcome to our webcast coverage for Intelsat’s Galaxy 31 32 mission, we had an on time liftoff at 11:06 a.m. Eastern time followed by successful ascent stage separation and two second stage engine burned as *** reminder. Today’s launch continues Intelsat’s Galaxy fleet refresh plant. Intelsat has the most extensive space and ground network combined worldwide with over 50 satellites, 60 teleports and point of presence on the ground as well as 100,000 miles of fiber. We’re coming up shortly about 10 seconds to go before deployment of the first of our two payloads aboard today confirmed separation on first payload And there is successful separation of the Galaxy 32 satellite. So it’s gonna make its way on to this Geo stationary transfer orbit and then continue with some burns to get into its operational orbit Later on in the mission. And we are going to jump back to another short coast phase before the second and final deployment of today’s mission of the Galaxy 31 payload that’s scheduled to happen in about five minutes. So we’ll see you back here at T plus 38. The coincidence of signal about these Welcome back to our coverage. We’re nearing the end of today’s mission for our customer intelsat. About five minutes ago we deployed the galaxy 32 satellite and we’re awaiting deployment of the second and final payload on today’s mission. Galaxy 31 which you can see on your screen there were deployed coming up just under about 10 seconds from now. Hey look to separation and there is successful separation of the Galaxy 31 satellite off to continue its mission. So all of us here at SpaceX want to give *** big thank you to our customer Intelsat for entrusting us with today’s mission. We also want to thank the range and the Federal Aviation Administration for their support and before we sign off SpaceX observed Veterans Day this past friday and we wanted to take this time to thank all of our veterans for their service. Thanks to all of our viewers for tuning in and for your continued support. We hope you have *** wonderful rest of the day and weekend.

SpaceX successfully launches rocket from Cape Canaveral after Hurricane Nicole

SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket carrying two geosynchronous satellites from Cape Canaveral Saturday morning.Intelsat’s Galaxy 31 (G-31) and Galaxy 32 (G-32) satellites will be part of Intelsat’s media satellite network that claims to deliver around 6,500 television channels around the globe. G-31 and G-32 are destined to serve North America in geosynchronous orbit.The Falcon 9 first stage rocket booster previously flew on Dragon’s first crew demonstration mission, the RADARSAT Constellation Mission, SXM-7 and 10 separate Starlink missions.The Intelsat G-31/G-32 mission launched at 11:06 a.m. SpaceX did not attempt to recover the Falcon 9 rocket booster used during the mission.

SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket carrying two geosynchronous satellites from Cape Canaveral Saturday morning.

Intelsat’s Galaxy 31 (G-31) and Galaxy 32 (G-32) satellites will be part of Intelsat’s media satellite network that claims to deliver around 6,500 television channels around the globe. G-31 and G-32 are destined to serve North America in geosynchronous orbit.

The Falcon 9 first stage rocket booster previously flew on Dragon’s first crew demonstration mission, the RADARSAT Constellation Mission, SXM-7 and 10 separate Starlink missions.

The Intelsat G-31/G-32 mission launched at 11:06 a.m. SpaceX did not attempt to recover the Falcon 9 rocket booster used during the mission.

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